Scrum in everyday life

Simone Kohl

2 mins read

Agile working methods like Scrum are more and more common in companies, because the approaches lead to better products and efficient development. But you can also use the method from project management in everyday life. 
But how could you integrate Scrum into everyday life?

grocery shopping

Instead of walking through the supermarket and taking everything that looks appetizing with you and noticing at home what you have forgotten, you could structure your shopping as follows: 
For the beginning a shopping list is a good possibility. The list becomes something like a backlog in Scrum, a kind of To-Do list. The individual items then become sprints, for example they are divided into vegetable or drink sprints. You can adjust the shopping card after every sprint.

when cleaning up 

One possibility to use scrum in everyday life is when cleaning up. First of all, the definition of done has to be discussed with the flatmate, i.e. when is the flat considered tidy? Here you could then set a time when it is only cleaned up and nothing else is done.

during the job search

Again, one must first think about it: What do I expect from a job? Afterwards, the possible jobs are searched for and it is checked whether the expectations match the offers. It is best to carry out short tests and check whether the hypotheses have been confirmed (prototyping). In a job this could be something like conversations with employees.

in family life

The first step is to set up the backlog. Each family member writes his or her tasks on post-its. In the best case, each family member has his own color for the post-its, so it remains clearer who has which tasks. 
Next, everyone can select the tasks for the day they want to have completed and stick them in the “To-Do” column. 
In the evening the completed to-do tasks can be moved to the done column, if this has not already happened during the day. For tasks where you need support from others you can add a column “testing” or “waiting”.


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Simone Kohl
Simone Kohl

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